Impact sommeil sur santé cérébrale

Are you often taking part in meetings or having to facilitate it yourself? It is then very likely that you have to give speeches in front of a large number of persons. If you are afraid and anxious, these feelings can make your intervention less efficient.

The fear of giving a speech in front of many persons is very common. It touches around 75% of people at different levels. It can be only a slight apprehension or an invasive fear which is called Glossophobia by specialists.

Fear is a natural reaction inherited from our ancestors. It is initially supposed to protect us from a “real” danger. Our brain prepares our body to run away from the danger or to fight against it (flight or fight). It is then provoking a wide range of physiological modifications, for example tachycardia or shortness of breath. Our brain is sometimes not able to make the difference between a real danger and an imaginary one. Indeed, giving a speech in front of a many persons is an imaginary danger, you will not die from it!

How can I overcome this fear?

  • First of all, it is important to be well prepared! You should organise your presentation and train yourself when it’s done. The training will allow you to memorize better and to know what it is about. You will be much more confident during the presentation.
  • Try then to identify the so-called « parasitic thoughts » or « limiting beliefs » such as « I will fail this presentation », « people are going to judge me », … . These thoughts prevent you from reaching your goals. Be aware of it and try to replace them with encouraging and positive sentences such as « I will stay calm and smiling », « I will be clear and able to send them my message ». This will help you to let go of your fears.
  • Try to practice visualisation exercises. Imagine the stage, imagine yourself when you are giving your speech. The goal is also to show to your brain that there is no real danger. We call this “mental imagery”. Imagine how you occupy the space, how strong and confident your voice is, convinced about your ideas. You like to perform this speech! You see your public nodding, agreeing to your ideas. Believe in it! Yes, your public can be charmed by your speech and ideas!

  • Try to work on your breath when you are training a few hours or minutes before. Deeply breathing in and out with the belly to make anxiety weaker is a relaxation technique. Stress can influence your breathing, and inversely. You can do these exercices with your hand on your belly. Better breathing will help you to reduce anxiety and to improve your speech. Your voice will also be more composed and calm.
  • Relax your body before the presentation. A stressed body is tensed, it doesn’t help at all to give a speech. To relax your body, shake your shoulders and release them. Do the same thing with your legs and even your face! (try to make faces to relax the muscles of your face, before being on stage of course!). This will allow you to have a relaxed body and to feel better.

With all these advices, forget about your fears and just do it! You are able to do it, believe in yourself!


Image

Caroline Joubert: Neuropsychologist

Caroline Joubert obtained a Master’s degree in Psychology from the Université de Caen with a specialisation in Neuropsychology and an Inter-University Diploma from the Université Paris 8 in Psychopathology and Neurological Illness. She has been responsible for neuropsychological assessments and neuropsychological rehabilitation of adults and children in several hospitals in France. At ELLISTRA, she is bringing her expertise in neuroscience to create new content (videos, articles, etc.).

RÉFÉRENCES

  • Carnegie Da., Carnegie Do. et Weyne D. (traduction). (1992). Comment parler en public. (Le livre de poche, 215p). (Original Title : The quick and easy way to effective speaking)
  • Le cerveau a tous les niveaux. Quand la peur prend les commandes. lecerveau.mcgill.ca, [En ligne]. Page consultée le 14 Septembre 2018. (English version).
  • LOPIN, D. (2016). - Parler en public sans stress en moins d'une heure (coaching). [Vidéo en ligne]. Repéré à https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4WLBbui2EE
  • Nikita A. (2011). Successful Public Speaking. (Link)
Impact sommeil sur santé cérébrale

How to deal with your fear to speak in public?

by Caroline Joubert

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Are you often taking part in meetings or having to facilitate it yourself? It is then very likely that you have to give speeches in front of a large number of persons. If you are afraid and anxious, these feelings can make your intervention less efficient.

The fear of giving a speech in front of many persons is very common. It touches around 75% of people at different levels. It can be only a slight apprehension or an invasive fear which is called Glossophobia by specialists.

Fear is a natural reaction inherited from our ancestors. It is initially supposed to protect us from a “real” danger. Our brain prepares our body to run away from the danger or to fight against it (flight or fight). It is then provoking a wide range of physiological modifications, for example tachycardia or shortness of breath. Our brain is sometimes not able to make the difference between a real danger and an imaginary one. Indeed, giving a speech in front of a many persons is an imaginary danger, you will not die from it!

How can I overcome this fear?

  • First of all, it is important to be well prepared! You should organise your presentation and train yourself when it’s done. The training will allow you to memorize better and to know what it is about. You will be much more confident during the presentation.
  • Try then to identify the so-called « parasitic thoughts » or « limiting beliefs » such as « I will fail this presentation », « people are going to judge me », … . These thoughts prevent you from reaching your goals. Be aware of it and try to replace them with encouraging and positive sentences such as « I will stay calm and smiling », « I will be clear and able to send them my message ». This will help you to let go of your fears.
  • Try to practice visualisation exercises. Imagine the stage, imagine yourself when you are giving your speech. The goal is also to show to your brain that there is no real danger. We call this “mental imagery”. Imagine how you occupy the space, how strong and confident your voice is, convinced about your ideas. You like to perform this speech! You see your public nodding, agreeing to your ideas. Believe in it! Yes, your public can be charmed by your speech and ideas!
  • Try to work on your breath when you are training a few hours or minutes before. Deeply breathing in and out with the belly to make anxiety weaker is a relaxation technique. Stress can influence your breathing, and inversely. You can do these exercices with your hand on your belly. Better breathing will help you to reduce anxiety and to improve your speech. Your voice will also be more composed and calm.
  • Relax your body before the presentation. A stressed body is tensed, it doesn’t help at all to give a speech. To relax your body, shake your shoulders and release them. Do the same thing with your legs and even your face! (try to make faces to relax the muscles of your face, before being on stage of course!). This will allow you to have a relaxed body and to feel better.

With all these advices, forget about your fears and just do it! You are able to do it, believe in yourself!


Image

Caroline Joubert: Neuropsychologist

Caroline Joubert obtained a Master’s degree in Psychology from the Université de Caen with a specialisation in Neuropsychology and an Inter-University Diploma from the Université Paris 8 in Psychopathology and Neurological Illness. She has been responsible for neuropsychological assessments and neuropsychological rehabilitation of adults and children in several hospitals in France. At ELLISTRA, she is bringing her expertise in neuroscience to create new content (videos, articles, etc.).

Image

Caroline Joubert: Neuropsychologue

Caroline Joubert a obtenu un Master en Psychologie avec une spécialisation en Neuropsychologie à l'Université de Caen et un diplôme inter-universitaire en Psychopathologie et Affections Neurologiques à l’Université Paris 8. Elle a été responsable d’évaluations et réhabilitations neuropsychologiques auprès d'adultes et d'enfants au sein de différents hôpitaux en France, ainsi qu'en libéral. Chez ELLISTRA, elle apporte son expertise en neuroscience pour créer divers contenus (vidéos, articles, etc.).

RÉFÉRENCES

  • Carnegie Da., Carnegie Do. et Weyne D. (traduction). (1992). Comment parler en public. (Le livre de poche, 215p). (Original Title : The quick and easy way to effective speaking)
  • Le cerveau a tous les niveaux. Quand la peur prend les commandes. lecerveau.mcgill.ca, [En ligne]. Page consultée le 14 Septembre 2018. (English version).
  • LOPIN, D. (2016). - Parler en public sans stress en moins d'une heure (coaching). [Vidéo en ligne]. Repéré à https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4WLBbui2EE
  • Nikita A. (2011). Successful Public Speaking. (Link)