Impact sommeil sur santé cérébrale

Our habits are directly linked with brain plasticity. Brain plasticity, which is also called neuroplasticity, refers to the mechanisms enabling our brain to change through our experiences.  New neuronal paths get created. The brain is really a dynamic system!

There are 2 important things you need to know:

  • Firstly, the brain loves to have its small habits. It prefers to use well established networks, which it knows well and with which it feels comfortable. This does not mean that habits are a bad thing. It is up to you to identify those which benefit you and those that you would like to change.
  • We can indeed develop a new habit or change an existing habit thanks to this process of brain plasticity. We will create new neuronal pathways, which after some time, will be gladly used by the brain!

Studies show that we need between 21 days and several months to change a habit. It will require time for sure, but don’t give up!

Let me give you some tips on how to do it :

  • If the new habit or activity you want to develop brings you pleasure it will work better! But since change is not always pleasurable, I will give you some other advice.
  • It is better to change only one habit at a time. And in some cases changing a single habit can positively influence other habits.
  • Go progressively! If your goal is to start exercising when it is not something you are used to, don’t plan to do high intensity 45-minute sessions three times a week right away! Start gently and gradually increase towards your final goal.
  • Be patient! It takes time but it is possible. Don’t blame yourself if you don’t succeed right away, be nice to yourself! So give yourself time, and don’t give up!
  • Staying motivated. It is the most important thing: motivation. It is an integral part of the process in changing habits!  

For example: you want to reduce your coffee consumption? Start slowly : Which coffee of the day seems the least difficult to eliminate? the one at 3pm? After all, you already drank one at 1:30 pm after the meal! So try to gradually replace this coffee with some other behavior. For example, go outside and get some fresh air for 5 minutes, eat a piece of fruit, or go up and down the stairs several times. Any physical activity is beneficial. try to adopt a new routine gradually over time, so that it becomes almost automatic as drinking coffee was before and don’t give up!


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Caroline Joubert: Neuropsychologist

Caroline Joubert obtained a Master’s degree in Psychology from the Université de Caen with a specialisation in Neuropsychology and an Inter-University Diploma from the Université Paris 8 in Psychopathology and Neurological Illness. She has been responsible for neuropsychological assessments and neuropsychological rehabilitation of adults and children in several hospitals in France. At ELLISTRA, she is bringing her expertise in neuroscience to create new content (videos, articles, etc.).

RÉFÉRENCES

Impact sommeil sur santé cérébrale

How to change your habits thanks to brain plasticity?

by Caroline Joubert

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Our habits are directly linked with brain plasticity. Brain plasticity, which is also called neuroplasticity, refers to the mechanisms enabling our brain to change through our experiences.  New neuronal paths get created. The brain is really a dynamic system!

There are 2 important things you need to know:

  • Firstly, the brain loves to have its small habits. It prefers to use well established networks, which it knows well and with which it feels comfortable. This does not mean that habits are a bad thing. It is up to you to identify those which benefit you and those that you would like to change.

  • We can indeed develop a new habit or change an existing habit thanks to this process of brain plasticity. We will create new neuronal pathways, which after some time, will be gladly used by the brain!

Studies show that we need between 21 days and several months to change a habit. It will require time for sure, but don’t give up!

Let me give you some tips on how to do it :

  • If the new habit or activity you want to develop brings you pleasure it will work better! But since change is not always pleasurable, I will give you some other advice.
  • It is better to change only one habit at a time. And in some cases changing a single habit can positively influence other habits.
  • Go progressively! If your goal is to start exercising when it is not something you are used to, don’t plan to do high intensity 45-minute sessions three times a week right away! Start gently and gradually increase towards your final goal.
  • Be patient! It takes time but it is possible. Don’t blame yourself if you don’t succeed right away, be nice to yourself! So give yourself time, and don’t give up!
  • Staying motivated. It is the most important thing: motivation. It is an integral part of the process in changing habits!  

For example: you want to reduce your coffee consumption? Start slowly : Which coffee of the day seems the least difficult to eliminate? the one at 3pm? After all, you already drank one at 1:30 pm after the meal! So try to gradually replace this coffee with some other behavior. For example, go outside and get some fresh air for 5 minutes, eat a piece of fruit, or go up and down the stairs several times. Any physical activity is beneficial. try to adopt a new routine gradually over time, so that it becomes almost automatic as drinking coffee was before and don’t give up!


Image

Caroline Joubert: Neuropsychologist

Caroline Joubert obtained a Master’s degree in Psychology from the Université de Caen with a specialisation in Neuropsychology and an Inter-University Diploma from the Université Paris 8 in Psychopathology and Neurological Illness. She has been responsible for neuropsychological assessments and neuropsychological rehabilitation of adults and children in several hospitals in France. At ELLISTRA, she is bringing her expertise in neuroscience to create new content (videos, articles, etc.).

Image

Caroline Joubert: Neuropsychologist

Caroline Joubert obtained a Master’s degree in Psychology from the Université de Caen with a specialisation in Neuropsychology and an Inter-University Diploma from the Université Paris 8 in Psychopathology and Neurological Illness. She has been responsible for neuropsychological assessments and neuropsychological rehabilitation of adults and children in several hospitals in France. At ELLISTRA, she is bringing her expertise in neuroscience to create new content (videos, articles, etc.).

RÉFÉRENCES